It begins early, the idea that there is only one right answer to a problem.

Here's part of a journal entry from when one of our children was in first grade:

She brought home several papers of the kind in which she had to identify beginning and ending sounds. The focus of one was a set of images, for which she was supposed to indicate whether the "p" sound came at the beginning or the end.

Next to the picture of a policeman, she had indicated that the "p" was at the end, and the the teacher had corrected it to the beginning, without further comment.

You can probably guess what comes next.

I asked our daughter what the picture was, and she replied, "cop."

What if I had not been there to assure her that her answer was perfectly correct, and to explain why the teacher thought it was wrong?

Posted by sursumcorda on Wednesday, April 12, 2023 at 6:14 am | Edit
Permalink | Read 334 times
Category Education: [first] [previous] [next] [newest] Politics: [first] [previous] [next] [newest] Children & Family Issues: [first] [previous] [next] [newest] Random Musings: [first] [previous] [next] [newest]
Comments

I spend a fair amount of time in my classes trying to assure students that there can be more than one right way to do a problem.



Posted by Kathy Lewis on Wednesday, April 12, 2023 at 12:30 pm
Add comment

(Comments may be delayed by moderation.)